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Group raises concern about limited voter registration exercise

Politics

9 months ago
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A group named the Ballot Education Project says they are much concerned about the impending limited voter registration exercise.

In a statement, they said “Our organization believes in the importance of ensuring a fair and transparent electoral process that encourages maximum participation from all eligible citizens.

“The decision to hold the registration exercise only at District Offices places an undue burden on individuals, especially those from remote areas, who now have to travel to the district capital to have their names added to the voter register.”

The Electoral Commission of Ghana has announced that it would commence a registration exercise for eligible Ghanaians who turned 18 years old after the 2020 registration exercise and other eligible voters who could not register on Tuesday, September 12, 2023.

The Chairperson of the Electoral Commission, Jean Mensa, who made this disclosure at a press briefing in Accra, dubbed, ‘Let the Citizen Know’, on August 17, 2023, indicated that the registration exercise would end on Monday, October 2, 2023.

She added that the exercise would be held at all the 268 district offices of the EC across the country.


Below is their full statement

Addressing Concerns Regarding Limited Voter Registration Exercise

The Ballot Education Project is deeply concerned about the recent decision by the Electoral Commission (EC) to conduct a limited registration exercise for the upcoming District Assembly Elections exclusively at the District Offices, rather than in the Electoral Areas. This decision has raised valid concerns among citizens, particularly regarding accessibility and inclusivity.

Our organization believes in the importance of ensuring a fair and transparent electoral process that encourages maximum participation from all eligible citizens. The decision to hold the registration exercise only at District Offices places an undue burden on individuals, especially those from remote areas, who now have to travel to the district capital to have their names added to the voter register.

Furthermore, the requirement for individuals without valid identification documents to arrange for two family members to vouch for them raises financial and logistical barriers, potentially excluding a significant portion of the population from participating in the democratic process.

The Ballot Education Project acknowledges the importance of maintaining the integrity of the electoral system and respects the autonomy of the Electoral Commission. However, we urge the EC to reconsider this decision in light of the potential negative impact it may have on voter participation and inclusivity.

We call upon the EC to explore alternative solutions that prioritize accessibility and inclusivity, such as setting up registration centres in Electoral Areas to facilitate the registration process for all eligible citizens. This approach would ensure that our democracy remains vibrant and representative, allowing individuals from all walks of life to exercise their right to vote without unnecessary obstacles.

In the spirit of promoting a healthy democratic environment, we encourage open dialogue between stakeholders, including civil society organizations, political parties, and the Electoral Commission, to address these concerns and find a solution that upholds the principles of fairness and inclusivity.

The Ballot Education Project remains committed to promoting voter education, civic engagement, and transparent electoral processes. We believe that together, we can work towards a stronger and more inclusive democracy for the benefit of all citizens.

Signed:

Albert Kweku Simpson
Director of Communication
Ballot Education Project.
Tel:0242508169

 

source: Theannouncergh.com